Events

Below is a list of past events that have been hosted by CDACT:

The cDACT Series is a forum for the presentation of cutting-edge research, creation, scholarship, and related activities. This range of free public events presents artists, musicians, curators, scholars, researchers, and industry representatives who critically consider the issues that arise at the intersection of experimental arts, digital culture, and information technology.

Sonic Residues, Curated by Christa Erickson, Zabet Patterson, Margaret Schedel, and Tamara Berg
SAC (Student Activities Center) Gallery Exhibition,
April 29 – May 12, 2008
May 12, 2008:
5-7 pm Gallery Reception,
7:30 pm Concert at Wang Center Theatre
9 pm DJ/VJ Party at the University Cafe
Our hearing’s
 asymmetrical: noticed sounds surprise us;
 echoes of shouts we make transform our
 voices; straight line of sound from us to
 shore’s followed by echo’s slithering
 around the lake’s perimeter. When I
 said “Fifty-five global services,”
 California Bell Telephone man replied
 (September ’65), “It’s now sixty-one.”
(John Cage, Aspen #4, item 4)

Sound is ever-present. Auditory mediation pervades life in the digital age — from soundtracks to mobile telephones and mp3 players. Sound indexes past times and distant places. It is texture, the unseen fabric of our environment, often lying just beyond our conscious perception. Sonic Residues creates spaces to reflect on the relationships shaped by sonic production and reproduction. Here sound streams across networks, interrupts spaces, and shapes private dreamscapes. It is produced by transcoding and translation. It is generated from bodies both artificial and natural, transmuted into images and objects. It is stretched and compressed, imagined and heard. It invites us to consider the habits and processes of listening, and to develop a critical understanding of the sites and locations of sound. Sonic Residues creates spaces to reflect on the relationships shaped by sonic production and reproduction. It combines a concert performance, gallery exhibit, portable media works, and lectures as different vehicles with which to explore these “sonic residues.”

Sonic Residues, Curated by Christa Erickson, Margaret Schedel, and Zabet Patterson
SAC (Student Activities Center) Gallery Exhibition,
April 29 – May 12, 2008
May 12, 2008:
5-7 pm Gallery Reception,
7:30 pm Concert at Wang Center Theatre
9 pm DJ/VJ Party at the University Cafe
Our hearing’s
 asymmetrical: noticed sounds surprise us;
 echoes of shouts we make transform our
 voices; straight line of sound from us to
 shore’s followed by echo’s slithering
 around the lake’s perimeter. When I
 said “Fifty-five global services,”
 California Bell Telephone man replied
 (September ’65), “It’s now sixty-one.”
(John Cage, Aspen #4, item 4)

Sound is ever-present. Auditory mediation pervades life in the digital age — from soundtracks to mobile telephones and mp3 players. Sound indexes past times and distant places. It is texture, the unseen fabric of our environment, often lying just beyond our conscious perception. Sonic Residues creates spaces to reflect on the relationships shaped by sonic production and reproduction. Here sound streams across networks, interrupts spaces, and shapes private dreamscapes. It is produced by transcoding and translation. It is generated from bodies both artificial and natural, transmuted into images and objects. It is stretched and compressed, imagined and heard. It invites us to consider the habits and processes of listening, and to develop a critical understanding of the sites and locations of sound. Sonic Residues creates spaces to reflect on the relationships shaped by sonic production and reproduction. It combines a concert performance, gallery exhibit, portable media works, and lectures as different vehicles with which to explore these “sonic residues.”

Sonic Residues Lecture Series: Pamela Z, Wang Center Chapel, 3:00 Monday, May 12, 2008
Pamela Z is a composer/performer who makes solo works combining a wide range of vocal techniques with electronic processing, sampled sounds, and The BodySynth™ gesture controller. She has also composed scores for dance, film, and new music chamber ensembles. Her audio works have been presented in exhibitions at the Whitney in NY and the Diözesanmueum in Cologne. She has toured throughout the US, Europe, and Japan in concerts and festivals including Bang on a Can, the Japan Interlink Festival, Other Minds, and the Venice Biennale. Her numerous awards include a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Creative Capital Fund, the CalArts Alpert Award, the ASCAP Award, and the NEA/JUSFC Fellowship.

Seriality, Recording and the Aesthetics of the Database, Melissa RagonaHISB 1006, 4:00 Wednesday, May 7, 2008
Melissa Ragona is Assistant Professor of Art at Carnegie Mellon University. Ragona’s critical and creative work focuses on sound design, film theory and new media practice and reception. Her essay, “Hidden Noise: Strategies of Sound Montage in the Films of Hollis Frampton,” appeared in the journal, October in 2004. She is currently completing a book manuscript: Readymade Sound: The Recording Aesthetics of Andy Warhol, which examines Warhol’s tape recording projects from the mid-sixties until the late 70s in light of the rich history of audio experiments in modern art in which sound and listening became central objects of study.

Digital Dreams Careers Lecture Series: Manuel Prossli, CEO of the NY Dance Project and cicfilms, 6:45 Wednesday, April 30, 2008
What is a screenwriter, director, or producer in film? What does storytelling in terms of motion pictures, a screenplay, mean? What different types of screenplays are there and how does the approach for a writer vary? How does directing actors, the following-one-vision principle and underlying screenplay come all together? Does the choice of shooting angle influence the emotional appearance of an actor? How to finance a motion picture production? Manuel Proissl, Stony Brook Alumnus and CEO of the NY Dance Project, will answer these questions in public forum. Mr. Proissl is a young talented film maker with the passion for drama. Besides his successful career as a graduate student in physics at Stony Brook University, he has always been truly fascinated by the magic of the movies. In 2005, Mr. Proissl started an intense research marathon of two years, and wrote his first screenplay for a feature production, “An American Dream,” based on a true life story. His project turned in 2007 into a major motion picture production of Paramount Pictures with an estimated budget of 250M Dollars. Currently in pre-production with his first feature, Mr. Proissl already works on his next screenplay, based on Stuart Isacoff’s fascinating and hugely original book “Temperament.” He lives and works in New York and Los Angeles.

Zabet Patterson, Splitting the Screen, HISB Faculty Lecture Series, HISB 1008, 4:30 Wednesday, April 30, 2008
Zabet Patterson specializes in the history and theory of digital media with a particular emphasis on the the intersection of art and computational media in the postwar period. She received her PhD in Rhetoric from UC Berkeley in 2007. Her dissertation, entitled Visionary Machines: A Genealogy of the Digital Image, was supported by fellowships from the Townsend Humanities Center, the Rhetoric Department, and the Josephine de Karman Foundation. Zabet spent 2005-6 as Visiting Assistant Professor in the departments of Art History and Art Theory and Practice at Northwestern University. Her publications include ‘Consuming Fantasy in the Digital Era’, in Porn Studies, a collection edited by Linda Williams, as well as forthcoming articles on Jim Campbell and John and James Whitney. She is presently Assistant Professor in Art History and Criticism at Stony Brook University, and a member of the Consortium for Digital Arts, Culture, and Technology (cDACT).

Digital Dreams Careers/Sonic Residues Lecture Series: Margaret Schedel, Stony Brook Music Faculty and KinesthetechSense, 6:45 Wednesday, April 16, 2008
Sounddesign can shape the visuals sometimes as much as the visuals can shape the sound. Sound exaggerates action or mediates it. Sound designers and composers combine and vary sounds to create unique effects or music required by the production. The experts on various aspects of sound design and computer music from the Music department discuss possible career paths and the kinds of skills, education, and experience necessary.

Artificial Reproduction Technologies Conference, April 5, 2008
Keynotes by cDACT’s Zabet Patterson and Margaret Schedel 

A graduate student conference at Stony Brook Manhattan sponsored by Women’s Studies, Artificial Reproduction Technologies, will question long-held conceptions of life, gender and personhood, and offer new possibilities for the creation of gendered subjectivities and foundations for altering identities. These technologies are often thought of as limited to the sciences, such as in reference to cloning or cybernetics, but can also serve to function in relation to historical, artistic and discursive tools. Artificial Reproduction Technologies and methodologies make the reproduction, mimicry, distortion and performance of “real” life possible, while at times calling the truthfulness of the real into question. This conference aims to generate a critical discussion of the scientific and cultural technologies that are used to create, limit and empower gendered subjectivities. Papers are invited from all disciplines and theoretical positions that deal with topics surrounding the copying of life, bodies and knowledge.

Sonic Residues Lecture Series: Luke DuBois, HISB 1008, 4:30 Wednesday, March 26, 2008
R. Luke DuBois is a composer, performer, video artist, and programmer living in New York City. He holds a doctorate in music composition from Columbia University and teaches interactive sound and video performance at Columbia’s Computer Music Center and at the Interactive Telecommunications Program at New York University. He has collaborated on interactive performance, installation, and music production work with many artists and organizations including Toni Dove, Matthew Ritchie, Todd Reynolds, Michael Joaquin Grey, Elliott Sharp, Michael Gordon, Bang on a Can, Engine27, Harvestworks, and LEMUR, and is the director of the Princeton Laptop Orchestra for its 2007 season. He is a co-author of Jitter, a software suite developed by Cycling’74 for real-time manipulation of matrix data. His music (with or without his band, the Freight Elevator Quartet), is available on Caipirinha/Sire, Cycling’74, and Cantaloupe music, and his artwork is represented by bitforms gallery in New York City.

Digital Dreams Careers Lecture Series: Catherine Katsaforous, Wilen Media, Tabler Performance Space, 6:45 Wednesday, March 5, 2008
Catherine, a Project Manager and a former Stony Brook Alumnus, will share her experiences, challenges, and breakthroughs entering the ‘real world’ with a degree in Art and a background in Computer Engineering. She will offer insights on working in a marketing firm as someone who oversees creative projects in print, web, and other media and makes them conform to client requirements. She will emphasize importance of experience in addition to skill and education.

Digital Dreams Careers Lecture Series: Brian Li, Chyron Corporation, Tabler Performance Space, 6:45 Wednesday, February 20, 2008
For over four decades and counting, the Chyron name has been synonymous with brilliant graphics for live broadcast and production. A former SBU Computer Science student Brian Li will talk about getting into the game industry.

Digital Dreams Careers Lecture Series: Matthew de Ganon, SVP, Emerging Businesses and The Weather Channel Interactive, www.weather.com, Tabler Performance Space, 6:45 Wednesday, February 13, 2008
Matthew de Ganon is senior vice president, weather.com and consumer applications software for The Weather Channel Interactive (TWCI). He will talk about those working in the interactive industry who are faced with a perfect storm of art, technology and commerce.

Towards Musical Intermedia: Structuring Intermodal Connectivity by David Bithell, Lecture-MAX/MSP Demonstration, Staller 3317, 3:00 Monday, November 12, 2007
Composer, musician, and intermedia artist David Bithell creates work that explores the connections between music, theater, and performance art while engaging with new technologies and real-time interactive environments. The resulting “Experimental Music Theater” brings the precision and meticulous structure of contemporary music together with
an understanding of performance, narrative, and humor drawn from recent theater and performance art.

Artist’s Talk, Discussion, and MFA Critiques, Coco Fusco, Staller 3216, 1:00 Thursday, October 4, 2007
Coco Fusco is a New York-based interdisciplinary artist and writer and Associate Professor at Columbia University. She has performed, lectured, exhibited and curated around the world since 1988. She is the author of English is Broken Here (The New Press,1995), The Bodies That Were Not Ours and Other Writings (Routledge/inIVA, 2001) and the editor of Corpus Delecti: Performance Art of the Americas (Routledge, 1999) and Only Skin Deep: Changing Visions of the American Self (Abrams, 2003). Fusco’s recent art projects combine electronic media and performance in a variety of formats, from staged multi-media performances incorporating large scale projections and closed circuit television to live performances streamed to the internet that invite audiences to chart the course of action through chat interaction. Fusco’s works have been included in such events as The Whitney Biennial, Sydney Biennale, The Johannesburg Biennial, The Kwangju Biennale, The London International Theatre Festival, and VideoBrasil.